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Thursday, January 10, 2013

Krasner, Lee


Gaea
1966
oil on canvas
175.3 x 318.8 cm (69 x 125 1/2 in.)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA

"With Jackson Pollock there was quiet solitude. Just to sit and look at the landscape. An inner quietness. After dinner, to sit on the back porch and look at the light. No need for talking. For any kind of communication." (Krasner)

Lee Krasner (1908 - 1984) was an influential American abstract expressionist painter in the second half of the 20th century. In 1945, she married artist Jackson Pollock, who was also influential in the abstract expressionism movement. She was born to an immigrant Russian-Jewish couple. Her early art training was at The Cooper Union, Art Students League, and the National Academy of Design in New York. Her headstrong, independent character often set Krasner at odds with her instructors at the conservative academy, where she nevertheless received a thorough grounding in drawing, painting, and design.

Krasner and Pollock gave each other reassurance and support during a period when neither's work was well-appreciated. Like Picasso during the brief period of his interaction with Braque, the daily give-and-take of Pollock and Krasner stimulated both artists. Pollock and Krasner fought a battle for legitimacy, impulsiveness and individual expression. They opposed an old-fashioned, conformist, and repressed culture unreceptive to these values, which was put off by the intricacy of Modernism in general.

Lee Krasner died in 1984, age 75, from natural causes. Six months after her death, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City held a retrospective exhibition of her work. A review of the exhibition in the New York Times noted that it "clearly defines Krasner's place in the New York School" and that she "is a major, independent artist of the pioneer Abstract Expressionist generation, whose stirring work ranks high among that produced here in the last half-century."
"I never violate an inner rhythm. I loathe to force anything... I don't know if the inner rhythm is Eastern or Western. I know it is essential for me. I listen to it and I stay with it. I have always been this way. I have regards for the inner voice. " (Krasner)
http://www.imaginarymuseum.net/view/flipcard